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NAB REPORTS

Vol.5

The National Association of Broadcasters

NATIONAL PRESS BUILDING ..... WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMES W. BALD WEN, Managing Director

NAB REPORTS * *

Copyright, 1936. The National Association of Broadcasters

Vol. 5 - - No. 1 JAN. 7, 1937

IN THIS ISSUE

Page

Duffy Copyright Bill . 1849

New Stations Granted . 1849

Annual Communications Commission Report . 1849

License Renewal for WHBC Recommended . 1849

Actors Bill Reintroduced . 1849

New Texas Station Recommended . 1849

Internal Revenue Cites Some Depreciation Averages for

Radio . 1849

Copeland Reintroduces Food Bill . 1850

Culkin Liquor Bill . 1850

Drys Protest Broadcasting . 1850

Federal Trade Commission Action . 1850

FTC Closes Cases . 1851

Federal Communications Commission Action . 1851

Dickstein Bill . 1857

Culkin Bill . 1857

Copeland Statement . 1858

Copeland Bill . 1860

DUFFY COPYRIGHT BILL

Senator Duffy of Wisconsin has reintroduced his copyright bill of the last session of Congress. Copies of the bill were not avail¬ able as NAB Reports went to press but the Senator stated that the new bill contains some “minor” changes in the text as ap¬ proved by the Senate last session.

NEW STATIONS GRANTED

The Federal Communications Commission this week granted a construction permit for the erection of a new broadcast station at Superior, Wis., to use 1200 kilocycles, 100 watts power and unlimited time on the air.

A construction permit for a new broadcast station at Visalia, Calif., was also granted to use 1190 kilocycles, 250 watts power and daytime operation.

A third construction permit for a new broadcast station was also granted for Bridgeton, N. J., to use 1210 kilocycles, 100 watts power and daytime operation.

ANNUAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION REPORT

The second annual report of the Federal Communications Com¬ mission for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1936, was made to Congress on Tuesday of this week.

The Commission made no recommendations for legislation. If any legislative recommendations are to be made this year they will be forwarded to Congress by another method.

The report is divided up into different sections including the office of the secretary ; the examining department ; law department ; engineering department; and accounting, statistical and tariff de¬ partment. The purpose of the report is to put into historical form the activities of the Commission during the past fiscal year.

LICENSE RENEWAL FOR WHBC RECOMMENDED

Nolan S. Walker applied to the Federal Communications Com¬ mission for a construction permit for the erection of a new station at Canton, Ohio, to use 1200 kilocycles, 100 watts and 250 watts LS and unlimited time on the air. Also station WHBC, at Canton, operating on the same frequency and with the same power asked for a license renewal; an application for consent to voluntary assign¬ ment of the station license and of the construction permit from Edward P. Graham to the Ohio Broadcasting Company; an ap¬ plication for modification of the construction permit, including an extension of time for completion; and an application of Nolan S.

SALES MANAGERS MEET CHICAGO January 18 and 19

The Sales Managers Division, under the leader¬ ship of Buryi Lotteridge (KFAB-KOIL, Omaha) will meet in Chicago at the Sherman Hotel January 18 and 19. Chairman Lotteridge has given a lot of time and effort to this meeting and the schedule promises an excellent opportunity to exchange view¬ points on some extremely important sales problems.

Walker to acquire the facilities heretofore granted to Edward P. Graham, licensee of WHBC.

Examiner Melvin H. Dalberg in Report No. 1-332 recommended that the application of Nolan S. Walker for a construction permit for a new station be denied ; that the application of license renewal for station WHBC be granted; that the application of Edward P. Graham for consent to voluntary assignment of license and con¬ struction permit to the Ohio Broadcasting Company be granted; and that the modification of construction permit for additional time for the erection of the station be granted.

ACTORS BILL REINTRODUCED

Representative Dickstein of New York has reintroduced his bill (H. R. 30) “to protect the artistic and earning opportunities in the United States for American actors, vocal musicians, operatic singers, solo dancers, solo instrumentalists and orchestral conductors and for other purposes.” The bill which has been referred to the House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization is identical with the bill which passed the House at the last session of Congress but was not taken up by the Senate. The bill will be found on page 1857. of this issue.

NEW TEXAS STATION RECOMMENDED

The Sweetwater Broadcasting Company applied to the Federal Communications Commission to grant it a construction permit for the erection of a new station at Sweetwater, Texas, to use 1310 kilocycles, 100 watts power, daytime operation.

Examiner R. H. Hyde, in Report No. 1-331 recommended that the application be granted. He found that “there is no local broad¬ cast station or primary service from any station available in the applicant’s area, and it is therefore concluded that there is a need for the proposed new station.” The Examiner found also in this case that “the establishment of the proposed station would pro¬ vide a needed broadcast service not otherwise available, and the granting of a permit, therefore would serve public interest, con¬ venience and necessity.”

INTERNAL REVENUE CITES SOME DEPRECIA¬ TION AVERAGES FOR RADIO

In a letter dated January 5 Deputy Commissioner Russell of the Bureau of Internal Revenue gives the ranges of serviceable lines within which the cases of many broadcasting companies have been approved. The letter reads as follows:

“In response to your request over the telephone, the following is submitted in regard to depreciation on the physical assets owned by the average broadcasting company.

“Depreciation, including obsolescence, for income tax purposes is determined with consideration being given to the facts available in each particular case. It has been found that due to different oper¬ ating conditions and locations, various financial policies and ac¬ counting practices, the allowance for depreciation cannot be predi¬ cated upon a general average.

1849

“The cases of many broadcasting companies before the Internal Revenue Bureau have been approved within the following ranges of serviceable lives; the depreciation deduction including both depreciation and normal obsolescence, the latter being recognized as a substantial factor in this particular industry:

“Studio control, speech input and transmitter equipment, 8 to 10 years.

“Antenna equipment, 10 to 12 years.

“Towers, 10 to IS years.

“Buildings, 25 to SO years.

“Furniture and Fixtures Office, 10 years.

“Furniture and Fixtures— Studio, 5 years.

“Pianos and other musical instruments, 10 years.”

Members will observe that allowance for depreciation cannot be predicated upon a general average. Each broadcaster should pro¬ duce all the facts pertinent to his own case and press for a decision thereon without reliance upon general practices.

COPELAND REINTRODUCES FOOD BILL

Senator Copeland of New York has reintroduced his pure food bill (S. S) which will be found, together with a statement on page 1860 of this issue.

CULKIN LIQUOR BILL

A bill has been introduced in the House (H. R. 13) which would prohibit the advertising of liquor by radio. The bill which has been referred to the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce will be found on page 1857 of this issue.

DRYS PROTEST BROADCASTING

Organized “drys” of the United States are using a “bootleg” radio station, barred from this country in the interest of public health and welfare, as a propaganda medium, is the charge made in a complaint filed with the Federal Communications Commission by C. D. Cecil, secretary of the National Institute of Manufacturers and Distributors, Inc.

The complaint specifically asks investigation of an announce¬ ment by Miss Ethel Hubler, editor and publisher of “The National Voice,” of Los Angeles, Calif., of “dry” broadcasts from Del Rio, Texas, by means of Station XERA, which is located in Villa Acuna, Mexico, “and over approximately 60 other stations in 30 different states.” The XERA Station is operated by Dr. John R. Brinkley, whose station, KFBB at Milford, Kans., was closed by the Federal Radio Commission about six years ago after a public hearing on charges that its broadcasts were “inimical to public health and wel¬ fare” and the nature of its programs conflicted with the law pro¬ hibiting the broadcasting of “profane, obscene, or indecent” utter¬ ances.

The complaint made by the National Institute of Manufacturers and Distributors, Inc., which is an organization of industrialists opposed to Prohibition, contends that the broadcast as announced by the “dry” publication, indicates violation of United States Law. It quotes Miss Hubler’s statement that her broadcast will emanate from Del Rio, Texas, and be transmitted by Station XERA, and declares :

“This announcement would indicate violation of the Federal ‘Communications Act of 1934’ (Public Law No. 416). The radio broadcasting station named XERA, is located on foreign soil, at Villa Acuna, Mexico, and the Communications Act of 1934 spe¬ cifically prohibits transmission of programs from the United States to foreign stations which can be heard in the United States.

“Further, this announcement by The National Voice suggests that this foreign station, XERA, one of the so-called “bootleg” sta¬ tions along the Rio Grande, which seriously interfere with the operation of stations in the United States licensed by your Com¬ mission, has been made an integral part of a broadcasting chain in this country which includes 60 stations in 30 states.”

The complaint also cites that the action of the Federal Radio Commission in closing the station operated by Brinkley in Kansas, was upheld by the United States District Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia in a decision which quoted the Biblical in¬ junction: “By their fruits ye shall know them.”

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ACTION Complaints

The Federal Trade Commission has alleged unfair competition in complaints against the following firms. The respondents will be given an opportunity to show cause why cease and desist orders should not be issued against them.

No. 3021. Charging unfair competition in the sale of soap, a complaint has been issued against Allen B. Wrisley Company and Allen B. Wrisley Distributing Company, also trading as Regal Soap Company, both of 6801 West 65th Street, Chicago, and Karl Mayer, George A. Wrisley, and Wrisley B. Oleson, copartners, trading as Karl Mayer & Co., all of' Merchandise Mart Building, Chicago.

The respondents are alleged to have advertised certain soaps as olive oil soaps, when in fact the oil or fat ingredient of these products was not entirely olive oil, according to the complaint.

In genuine olive oil soap, the complaint points out, the oil ingredient is olive oil to the exclusion of all other oils and fats. Such product is in demand as a high quality soap, free from sub¬ stances harmful to the skin or to delicate fabrics.

No. 3022. Unfair trade representation in the sale of radio receiving sets, radio tubes, and supplies, are alleged in a complaint issued against Sun Radio Service & Supply Corporation, 938 F. Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.

Advertising its products as “Newest R. C. A. Licensed Auto¬ matic Featuring the New Metal Tube,” the respondent company, through its representations, is alleged to have deceived buyers into believing that its products were those of the Radip Corporation of America and its subsidiaries, and that its glass tubes were metal tubes in which the technical elements were sealed in a vacuum of steel, when these were not the facts.

Thirteen wholesalers and distributors of sponges in interstate commerce, said to constitute a large and important part of such wholesale trade in the United States, are named respondents in a complaint alleging practices which have the effect of monopoly and unreasonable restraint of trade.

Nos. 3024 and 3025. Principal respondents are The Sponge Institute, of Washington, D. C., its officers and members, in¬ cluding the thirteen companies, and the Florida Sponge Packers Association, of Tarpon Springs, Fla., its officers and members, including six packing firms located at Tarpon Springs, Fla.

The Commission has also issued a complaint against the Tarpon Springs Sponge Exchange, Inc., of Tarpon Springs, Fla., charging conspiracy and restraint of trade by member sponge pack¬ ers and producers. They are alleged to have combined to prevent all purchases of wool sponges, in or outside the exchange, between February 15, 1935, and May 1, 1935. One effect, it is alleged, was an increase in the price of wool sponges to wholesalers, re¬ tailers and the public.

All respondents named in the complaint against The Sponge Institute are charged with entering into an agreement, combination and conspiracy to create monopoly in themselves in the sale of sponges to wholesalers and retailers throughout the United States. The packers, comprising the Florida Sponge Packers Association, are alleged to have1 agreed with the institute and its members, to whom they furnished sponges for wholesale and retail distribution, that such packers would not circularize any trade outside of the “bona fide sponge houses” regularly established by the institute, and would either confine their sales to such bona fide houses or would make a price difference of 20 per cent to other houses not designated as bona fide. The packers are alleged to have agreed to sell to such other houses, even at the 20 per cent increase, only if they received the order unsolicited or placed by personal call.

The packers are alleged to have adhered to this plan, and, by concert of action, to have failed and refused to sell sponges to dealers not listed by the institute as bona fide.

Pursuant to the agreement, the institute is alleged to have fur¬ nished its members with a list of the packers who were cooperating in the plan to restrict sales, causing them to confine their purchases to such cooperating packers, and according to the complaint, whenever the institute discovered that a packer had made a sale contrary to the agreement, its name was taken off the list and such packer was blacklisted and thereafter denied the business of institute members.

Stipulations and Orders

The Commission has issued the following cease and desist orders and stipulations:

No. 1863. Lancaster Cigars, Inc., Red Lion, Pa., agrees to stop using on labels attached to containers the word “Havana” to describe cigars not composed of or manufactured from Havana tobacco grown in Cuba, and to cease employing the word “Havana” in any way to imply that such cigars are made entirely from Havana tobacco. The expression “Havana Blend” will not be printed on labels, implying that the cigars so marked are composed in substantial part of Havana tobacco, when such is not a fact.

1850

No. 1864. The Harker Pottery Company, Chester, W. Va.,

stipulates that it will stop employing the words “china” and “chinaware” to describe articles which are not non-porous, vitreous or translucent. The stipulation sets out that to well-informed members of the trade and purchasing public, the word “china” or “chinaware” means an earthen vessel which is non-porous, vitreous and translucent, but that the respondent’s products, as represented, does not possess these properties.

No. 1868. R. S. Bacon Veneer Co., 4702 Augusta Blvd., Chicago, agrees not to use in its printed matter the term “African Walnut” to describe its products, implying that they are made of wood derived from trees of the walnut or “Juglandaceae” family. The respondent company also agrees not to use the word “walnut,” either alone or in connection with the word “African” or “Tiger- wood,” or in any other way which may have the effect of causing buyers to believe that the articles so described are made of wood derived from trees of the walnut family, when such is not a fact.

No. 1869. Union Pharmacal Co., Inc., 67 Irving Place, New York City, selling so-called “Economy First-Aid Kits,” will discontinue printing on the cartons in which the kits are packed certain exaggerated or misleading assertions concerning the value of the kits or the price at which they are sold, or are intended to be sold, in the usual course of trade. The stipulation points out that these kits were marked for sale at a certain price, when in fact this was much in excess of the price at which they were actually sold, or intended to be sold.

No. 2565. The National Electrical Manufacturers Asso¬ ciation, of New York City, and sixteen member manufacturers of power cable and wire, have been served with an order to cease and desist from certain unfair trade practices held to have been per¬ formed under an illegal agreement, combination or conspiracy. The practices prohibited included, principally, the maintenance of uniform selling prices.

All material facts alleged in the amended complaint were ad¬ mitted by the respondents to be true and the findings in the case are a paraphrase of the admitted allegations.

Member companies named as respondents are American Elec¬ trical Works, Philadelphia, now known as Kennecott Wire and Cable Company; American Steel and Wire Company, Worcester, Mass.; Anaconda Wire and Cable Co., New York; Bishop Wire and Cable Corporation, New York; Boston Insulated Wire and Cable Co., Boston; Crescent Insulated Wire and Cable Co., Tren¬ ton, N. J.; General Cable Corporation, New York; General Elec¬ tric Co., Schenectady, N. Y.; Habirshaw Cable and Wire Cor¬ poration, New York; National Electrical Products Corporation, Pittsburgh; The Okonite Co., Passaic, N. J.; Phelps-Dodge Copper Products Corporation, New York; John A. Roebling’s Sons Co., Trenton, N. J.; Simplex Wire and Cable Co., Boston; Triangle Conduit and Cable Co., Brooklyn; and United States Rubber Products, Inc., New York.

Nos. 2939 and 2515. Cease and desist’ orders have been issued against two New York cosmetics and toilet goods companies, requiring them to cease and desist from unfair competition in violation of section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act. The respondent companies are Helena Rubinstein, Inc., 8 E. Fifty- Seventh St., and B. H. Krueger, Inc., 151 W. Nineteenth St.

The order against Helena Rubinstein, Inc., directs that it cease advertising that its cosmetics, facial creams and toilet prepara¬ tions will serve as a food for, or nourish, the skin, muscles, or tissues; will prevent crow’s feet and wrinkles, strengthen eye nerves, rebuild worn-out cells and dissolve fatty tissues or act as effective weight reducers.

B. H. Krueger, Inc., is ordered to stop representing that its cosmetics and toilet preparations, including perfumes, soaps, toilet water and similar articles, are of English manufacture or origin, or imported from England. The respondent company is also ordered to cease asserting that its articles are made for, or dis¬ tributed by, an English company or a company with offices in England or Canada, when such is not a fact.

No. 2964. Pratt Food Co., 126 Walnut St., Philadelphia, has been ordered to discontinue certain unfair trade representa¬ tions in the sale of poultry medicine.

In selling “Pratt’s ‘Split-Action’ N-K Capsules” or any product of substantially the same composition and effect, the respondent company is directed to cease and desist representing that its prep¬ aration will destroy all worms and all parts of worms, including tapeworm heads, with which poultry may be infested.

FTC CLOSES CASES

No. 2379. The Federal Trade Commission has entered an order closing its case against Samson Paper Products Corpora¬

tion, 118 Greene St., New York City, and Louis, Harry and Moe Hyman, who had been charged with use of unfair methods of competition in connection with the sale of roll paper, in viola¬ tion of Section S of the Federal Trade Commission Act.

The Commission reserved the right to reopen the case should the facts so warrant.

No. 2906. The Commission has also issued an order closing its case against R. H. Macy & Co., New York City, following that company’s signing of a stipulation to discontinue certain unfair trade practices in the sale of razor blades as alleged in a complaint directed against it by the Commission in August, 1936.

In its stipulation, the respondent company agrees not to resume the use of representations contained in an advertisement, or similar representations implying that razor blades sold by it have been made under its own supervision, when such is not a fact.

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ACTION

HEARING CALENDAR

The following broadcast hearings are scheduled for hearing at the Commission for the week beginning Monday, January 11.

Monday, January 11 HEARING BEFORE AN EXAMINER (Broadcast)

NEW Peninsula Newspapers, Inc., Palo Alto, Calif. C. P., 1160 kc., 250 watts, daytime.

NEW W. H. Marolf, Escanaba, Mich. C. P., 1500 kc., 100 watts, unlimited time.

NEW Escanaba Daily Press Co., Escanaba, Mich. C. P., 1500 kc., 100 watts, daytime.

Tuesday, January 12

HEARING BEFORE AN EXAMINER (Broadcast)

NEW H. W. Wilson & Ben Farmer, Wilson, N. C. C. P., 1310 kc., 100 watts, daytime.

NEW Vincennes Newspapers, Inc., Vincennes, Ind. C. P., 1200 kc., 100 watts, 250 watts LS, unlimited time.

KWBG The Nation’s Center Broadcasting Co. Inc., Hutchinson, Kans. C. P., 550 kc., 250 watts, unlimited time. Present assignment: 1420 kc., 100 watts, unlimited time.

Wednesday, January 13 HEARING BEFORE AN EXAMINER (Broadcast)

WILM— Delaware Broadcasting Co., Wilmington, Del. C. P., 1420 kc., 100 watts, share WAZL.

WMBD Peoria Broadcasting Co., Peoria, Ill. C. P., 1440 kc., 1 KW, 5 KW LS, unlimited time. Present assignment: 1440 kc., 500 watts, 1 KW LS, unlimited time.

WHOM New Jersey Broadcasting Corp., Jersey City, N. J. C. P., 1450 kc., 250 watts, 1 KW LS, unlimited time. Pres¬ ent assignment: 1450 kc., 250 watts, unlimited time.

Thursday, January 14

HEARING BEFORE THE COMMISSION EN BANC

WBBC Brooklyn Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Modifi¬ cation of license, 1400 kc., 500 watts, unlimited time. (Re¬ quests facilities of WARD, WVFW & WLTH.) Present assignment: 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WLTH, WARD & WVFW.

WBBC Brooklyn Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Renewal of license, 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WLTH, WARD & WVFW.

WBBC Brooklyn Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Re¬ newal of license, 1400 kc., 500 watts (auxiliarv transmitter), share WARD, WLTH & WVFW.

WVFW Paramount Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y.— Modi¬ fication of license, 1400 kc., 500 watts, unlimited time (Request facilities of WARD, WLTH & WBBC). Present assignment: 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WARD, WLTH & WBBC.

1851

WVFW Paramount Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Re¬ newal of license, 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WARD, WLTH & WBBC.

WVFW Paramount Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. C. P., to make changes in equipment; 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WARD, WLTH & WBBC.

WVFW Paramount Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Trans¬ fer of control of corporation; 1400 kc„ 500 watts, share WARD, WLTH & WBBC.

NEW Brooklyn Daily Eagle Broadcasting Co., Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. C. P., 1400 kc., 500 watts, unlimited time. (Requests facilities of WBBC, WLTH, WARD & WVFW.)

WEVD Debs Memorial Radio Fund, Inc., New York, N. Y.— Modification of license; 1400 kc., 1 KW, unlimited time. (Requests facilities of WBBC, WLTH, WARD & WVFW.)

WARD United States Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. C. P. to move transmitter; 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WVFW, WLTH & WBBC.

WARD United States Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Renewal of license; 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WVFW, WLTH & WBBC.

WARD United States Broadcasting Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. Voluntary assignment of license to Kings Broadcasting Corp.; 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WVFW, WLTH & WBBC.

WLTH Voice of Brooklyn, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y.— Renewal of license; 1400 kc., 500 watts, share WARD, WVFW & WBBC.

WLTH Voice of Brooklyn, Inc., Brooklyn, N. Y. Voluntary assignment of license to Kings Broadcasting Corp.;1400 kc., 500 watts, share WARD, WVFW & WBBC.

Friday, January 15

HEARING BEFORE AN EXAMINER (Broadcast)

KLPM John B. Cooley, Minot, N. Dak. C. P., 1300 kc., 1 KW, unlimited time.

WCOA Pensacola Broadcasting Co., Pensacola, Fla. C. P., 1340 kc., 1 KW, unlimited time. Present assignment: 1340 kc., 500 watts, unlimited time.

NEW Bay County Publishers, Inc., Panama City, Fla. C. P., 1420 kc., 100 watts, unlimited time.

FURTHER HEARING BEFORE AN EXAMINER (Broadcasting)

NEW Richard M. Casto, Johnson City, Tenn. C. P., 1200 kc., 100 watts, 250 watts LS, unlimited time.

APPLICATIONS GRANTED

KXRO KXRO, Inc., Aberdeen, Wash. Granted C. P. approving transmitter and studio sites, installation of new equipment and vertical radiator, and increase in day power from 100 watts to 250 watts.

KGEZ Donald C. Treloar, Kalispell, Mont. Granted C. P. to install new antenna and move transmitter locally south of city limits 2)4 miles.

WNBZ Earl J. Smith & Wm. Mace, d/b as Smith and Mace, Saranac Lake, N. Y. Granted C. P. to make changes in equipment.

WHAS The Louisville Times Co., Louisville, Ky. Granted C. P. to move transmitter site and install new equipment and vertical radiator.

WJTN James Broadcasting Co., Inc., Jamestown, N. Y. Granted C. P. to move transmitter and studio locally; install new equipment and vertical radiator, and increase power from 50 to 100 watts night, 250 watts day.

NEW McNary & Chambers, College Park, Md. Granted C. P. for new experimental station, frequency of 1080 kc., 100 watts, 12 midnight to 6 a. m., EST, for the purpose of ex¬ perimenting with synchronizing a booster broadcast station without the use of wire lines.

WLW The Crosley Radio Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio. Granted C. P., for changes in equipment.

WJBK James F. Hopkins, Inc., Detroit, Mich. Granted license to cover C. P. as modified, for installation of new equip¬ ment, extension of commencement and completion dates; 1500 kc., 100 watts night, 250 watts day, unlimited time.

WNEL Juan Piza, San Juan, P. R. Granted license to cover C. P. for changes in equipment, increase in night power

from 500 watts to 1 KW, and day power from 500 watts to 2)4 KW; 1290 kc., unlimited.

KEHE The Evening Herald Pub. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. Granted license to cover C. P. for move of transmitter and studio sites; installation of new equipment and vertical radiator; increase in power from 500 watts night, 1 KW day,. sharing KELW to 1 KW night, 5 KW day, unlimited; 780 kc. Also granted authority to determine operating power by direct measurement of antenna input.

KFWB Warner Bros. Broadcasting Corp., Hollywood, Cal. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing new transmitter site, installation of vertical radiator and new equipment; in¬ crease in day power from 2)4 KW to 5 KW; unlimited. Also granted authority to determine operating power by direct measurement of antenna input.

KPLT North Texas Broadcasting Co., Paris, Tex. Granted license to cover C. P. for new station; 1500 kc., 100 watts, daytime only.

KID KID Broadcasting Co., Idaho Falls, Idaho. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing local move of transmitter site, installation of vertical radiator; increase in power from 250 watts night, 500 watts day, to 500 watts night, 1 KW day, unlimited, 1320 kc.

KFXD Frank E. Hurt, Nampa, Idaho Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing installation of new equipment.

WABY— The Adirondack Broadcasting Co., Inc., Albany, N. Y. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing changes in trans¬ mitter and studio sites, installation of new equipment, and vertical radiator.

WABI— Community Broadcasting Service, Bangor, Me. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing move of transmitter site, in¬ stallation of new equipment and vertical radiator, increase in day power to 250 watts, 1200 kc., 100 watts night.

WLBZ Maine Broadcasting Co., Inc., Bangor, Me. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing installation of new equip¬ ment.

KVOA— Arizona Broadcasting Co., Inc., Tucson, Ariz. Granted license to cover C. P. as modified, authorizing installation of new equipment, and vertical radiator; increase in power from 500 watts to 1 KW, 1260 kc., unlimited.

KSCJ Perkins Bros. Co. (The Sioux City Journal), Sioux City, la. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing changes in equipment and increase in daytime power to 5 KW ; 1330 kc., 1 KW night.

WDBO Orlando Broadcasting Co., Inc., Orlando, Fla. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing local move of station, in¬ stallation of new equipment and increase in power to 1 KW ; 580 kc., unlimited.

KLS S. W. Warner & E. N. Warner, d/b as Warner Bros., Oak¬ land, Cal. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing in¬ stallation of new equipment.

WBLK The Exponent Co., Clarksburg, W. Va. Granted modifi¬ cation of C. P. for change in equipment.

WMFR Hart and Nelson (J. A. Hart & Wayne M. Nelson), High Point, N. C. Granted voluntary assignment of license to radio station WMFR, Inc.; 1200 kc., 100 watts, daytime only.

WATL J. W. Woodruff and S. A. Cisler, Jr., d/b as Atlanta B/c Co., Atlanta, Ga. Granted voluntary assignment of C. P. to J. W. Woodruff, d/b as Atlanta B/c Co.; 1370 kc., 100 watts night, 250 watts day, unlimited.

WSPD Toledo Broadcasting Co., Toledo, Ohio. Granted volun¬ tary assignment of license to the Fort Industry Co.; 1340 kc., 1 KW night, 5 KW day, unlimited.

WFTC Jonas Wieland, Kinston, N. C. Granted modification of C. P. to install different equipment than authorized in C. P.

WTAR WTAR Radio Corp., Norfolk, Va. Granted modification of C. P. to move auxiliary transmitter to same location as that authorized by C. P. for the main transmitter and use same directional antenna with that station operating with power of 1 KW for emergency operation only.

WNOX Continental Radio Co., Knoxville, Tenn. Granted modi¬ fication of C. P. to install new equipment and extend com¬ mencement date to 60 days after grant, and completion date to 180 days thereafter.

KFRO Voice of Longview, Longview, Tex. Granted modifica¬ tion of C. P. to make changes in equipment and extend commencement date to 30 days after grant.

WMIN Edward Hoffman, St. Paul, Minn. Granted modifica¬ tion of license to change name from Edw. Hoffman to Ed¬ ward Hoffman, d/b as WMIN Broadcasting Co.

1852

KFXJ R. G. Howell and Chas. Howell, d/b as Western Slope Broadcasting Co., Grand Junction, Colo. Granted authority to install automatic frequency control equipment.

WORC Alfred F. Kleindienst, Worcester, Mass. Granted author¬ ity to install automatic frequency control equipment.

WJTN— James Broadcasting Co., Inc., Jamestown, N. Y. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing changes in equipment.

WEAN Shepard Broadcasting Service, Inc., Providence, R. I. Granted license to cover C. P.; 780 kc., 1 KW, unlimited time employing directional antenna system.

KRBC Reporter Broadcasting Co., Abilene, Tex. Granted license to cover C. P. authorizing installation of new equipment and increase in day power from 100 watts to 250 watts; 1420 kc., 100 watts night, unlimited.

NEW The Croslev Radio Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio, Mobile. Granted C. P. for new low relay b/c station; frequencies of 1622, 2058, 2150 and 2790 kc., 50 watts.

NEW The WGAR Broadcasting Co., Mobile, Cleveland, Ohio. Granted C. P. for new low relay b/c station; frequencies of 1622, 2058, 2150 and 2790 kc., 100 watts.

NEW The WGAR Broadcasting Co., Mobile, Cleveland, Ohio. Granted license covering above.

NEW National Broadcasting Co., Inc., Fixed, New York City. Granted C. P. and license for new general experimental sta¬ tion for relay broadcasting; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40500 kc., 100 watts.

NEW National Broadcasting Co., Inc., Fixed, New York City. Granted C. P. and license for new general experimental sta¬ tion for relay broadcasting; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 25 watts.

W4XBW— WDOD Broadcasting Corp., Chattanooga, Tenn. Granted C. P. to move transmitter locally and install an¬ tenna system on roof of Hotel Patten.

W8XIK The Crosley Radio Corp., Mobile (Cincinnati, Ohio). Granted C. P. to increase power from 30 to 50 watts.

W8XIL The Crosley Radio Corp., Mobile (Cincinnati, Ohio). Granted C. P. to increase power from 30 to 50 watts.

NEW Cleveland Radio Broadcasting Corp., Mobile Granted C. P. for new high relay experimental b/c station; frequen¬ cies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 10 watts.

Also granted license covering same.

NEW Cleveland Radio Broadcast Corp., Mobile Granted C. P. for new high relay experimental b/c station; frequencies of 38900, 39100, 39300 and 39500 kc., 100 watts.

Also granted license covering same.

NEW Cleveland Radio Broadcast Corp., Mobile Granted C. P. and license for new experimental high relay b/c station ; frequencies of 39700, 39900, 40800, 41400 kc., 10 watts.

NEW— Rockford Broadcasters, Inc., Mobile (Rockford, Ill.). Granted C. P. for new low relay station; frequencies of 1646, 2090, 2190 and 2830 kc., 50 watts.

NEW Rockford Broadcasters, Inc., Mobile (Rockford, Ill.) . Granted C. P. for new experimental high relay station; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 2 watts.

W9XAK Kansas State College of Agriculture and Applied Science, Manhattan, Kans. Granted modification of license authoriz¬ ing addition of A3 emission for oral broadcasting associated with visual broadcasting.

W6XKG Ben S. McGlasahan, Los Angeles, Cal. Granted modi¬ fication of license to change frequencies from all four in Group C to 25950 kc. under Group A of Rule 1053(a).

W1XAL World Wide Broadcasting Corp., Boston, Mass. Granted modification of license to increase power from 10 KW to 20 KW.

W4XH Virgil V. Evans, d/b as The Voice of South Carolina, Spartanburg, S. C. Granted modification of license to change frequencies from all four listed in Group C to 25950 kc., listed in Group A of Rule 1053(a).

W9XPT Woodmen of the World Life Ins. Assn. Mobile, Omaha, Neb. Granted license to cover C. P. for new relay broadcast station; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 2 watts.

W9XPX Woodmen of the World Life Ins. Assn., Mobile, Omaha, Neb. Granted license to cover C. P. for new relay broadcast station; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 2 watts.

WlXLV The WATR Co., Inc., Mobile (Waterbury, Conn.). Granted license to cover C. P. for new relay broadcast station; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 10 watts.

WAAK WSOC, Inc., Mobile (Charlotte, N. C.).— Granted license

to cover C. P. for new relay broadcast station; frequencies of 1622, 2058, 2150 and 2790 kc., 40 watts.

W4XCH Wilton E. Hall, Mobile (Anderson, S. C.).- Granted license to cover C. P. for new experimental relay broadcast station ; frequencies of 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 0.5 watts power.

W4XCI The Atlanta Journal Co., Mobile (Atlanta, Ga.). Granted license to cover C. P. for new relay broadcast sta¬ tion ; frequencies 31100, 34600, 37600 and 40600 kc., 10 watts.

KAAD Fort Worth Broadcasters, Inc., Mobile (Fort Worth, Tex.). Granted license to cover C. P. for new relay station; frequencies 1622, 2058, 2150, and 2790 kc., 40 watts.

APPLICATIONS DISMISSED

The following applications, heretofore set for hearing, were dis¬ missed at request of applicants:

NEW Eastern Broadcasting Co., Portland, Maine. C. P., 1210 kc., 100 watts, unlimited.

WIOD Isle of Dreams Broadcasting Corp., Miami, Fla. C. P., 970 kc., 5 KW, unlimited.

NEW St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce, St. Petersburg, Fla. C. P., 1050 kc., 5 KW, limited.

NEW Carolina Adv. Corp., Florence, S. C.— C. P., 1200 kc., 100 watts, unlimited.

WKZO WKZO, Inc., Kalamazoo, Mich. Special experimental authority, 590 kc., 250 watts, 1 KW LS, unlimited.

APPLICATION DENIED

WQDM E. J. Regan and F. Arthur Bostwick, d/b as Regan and Bostwick, St. Albans, Vt.— Denied special temporary au¬ thority to operate on frequency 1390 kc., with 100 watts power, at location authorized by C. P., employing Class AB or a prime modulation using 845 Tubes, in order to facilitate installation of 1-KW equipment authorized by C. P.

SET FOR HEARING

NEW Malcolm H. Clack (Clack Radio Service), Amarillo, Tex. Application for C. P. for new broadcast station at Amarillo, Tex., to operate on 1500 kc., 100 watts, unlimited time. Transmitter and studio sites are to be determined with Commission approval.

NEW David J. Mercier and Geo. F. Warren, d/b as Northern Broadcasting Co., Traverse City, Mich. Application for C. P. for new broadcast station at Traverse City, Mich., as amended 11-2-36, to operate on 830 kc., 500 watts, day¬ time only.

NEW Beaumont Broadcasting Assn., Beaumont, Tex. Applica¬ tion as amended 12-8-36 for C. P. for new broadcast station at Beaumont, Tex., to operate on 1420 kc., 100 watts, un¬ limited time.

KMA May Seed & Nursery Co., Shenandoah, Iowa. Hearing before Broadcast Division on application for modification of license to increase night power from 1 KW to 5 KW.

WMBO WMBO, Inc., Auburn, N. Y. Application for Commis¬ sion’s consent to transfer control of WMBO, Inc., licensee of Station WMBO, from Roy L. Albertson to Auburn Pub¬ lishing Co.

WSAU Northern Broadcasting Co., Inc., Wausau, Wis. Appli¬ cation for modification of C. P. requesting increase in time of operation from daytime to unlimited.

SPECIAL AUTHORIZATIONS

WTHT The Hartford Times, Inc., Hartford, Conn. Granted special temporary authority to operate from local sunset (4:45 p. m.) to 12 midnight, EST, January 6, 1937, in order to broadcast inaugural ceremonies, also opening of State Legislature.

WABL American Airlines, Inc., Washington, D. C. Granted ex¬ tension of special temporary authority to operate a mobile relay broadcast transmitter aboard an American Airlines plane some time between January 4th and 14th, 1937, weather permitting, for transmission to NBC of program material from plane while flying over Exline, Ill.

KFRO Voice of Longview, Longview, Tex. Granted special tem¬ porary authority to operate from local sunset (5:15 p. m., CST) to 9 p. m. on Sundays, January 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 1937, in order to broadcast services of the Kelly Memorial Methodist Church, Longview, Tex.

1853

WRBL WRBL Radio Station, Inc., Columbus, Ga.— Granted special